1928 | Home | Titles

1929

A rare poster for 'Homeless Homer' HOMELESS HOMER
Release Date: January 7, 1929
Copyright Date: LP25827 November 12, 1928
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: November 15, 1928
Direction: Isadore Freleng and Rudolph Ising
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Big-hearted Oswald takes little "Homeless Homer" in out of the snow on Thanksgiving Day to stuff him with turkey. Homer proves a thankless little imp of Satan. Oswald protests when Homer eats peas with his knife. Does Homer heed Oswald's advice? He does not! Instead he gets ruder and ruder.
      When dinner is over, Oswald feels obliged to give Homer a bath. At least he starts to, but Homer puts up an awful fight and lands Oswald in the tub. While Oswald is recovering from that indignity, the ruthless little gamine sneaks in and ties a rope to unsuspecting Oswald's ankle.
      After running all over the house, Homer finally fastens the other end of the rope in the player piano—what happens next, Oswald will never forget! Nor will he ever again entertain a "Homeless Homer."
Notes: Elements of the cartoon are derived from ALICE'S ORPHAN (Disney 1926), on which Freleng and Ising labored. As the silent era Disney staff went its various ways, plot elements would also reappear in LITTLE ORPHAN WILLIE (Iwerks 1930), BIG-HEARTED BOSKO (Warner 1932), and THE BUTCHER BOY (Lantz 1932).
Errors: Animation: The Art of Friz Freleng erroneously states that this short was released in 1928.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

Yanky Clippers YANKY CLIPPERS
Release Date: January 21, 1929
Copyright Date: LP25941 December 26, 1928
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: December 29, 1928
Direction: Walter Lantz and Tom Palmer
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald is proprietor of a barber shop. It certainly is the world's best! Out in front, the animated barber pole seizes prospective customers, willing or not, and shoots them through the roof into the barber's chair. When Oswald is finished with them, they have difficulty recognizing themselves. The hippo is reduced to a mere shadow of himself, and the elephant's trunk is curled tighter than tight.
      The villain Wolf [Pete], impatient over being kept waiting for a manicure, has Oswald pretty well scared. However, he made himself up as a fascinating manicurist and jollies Wolf into good humor. Wolf has an eye for pretty young things and suggests a ride in his great big car. Oswald keeps up the bluff until Wolf starts necking and then everything's off, including Oswald's disguise! Finally Wolf throws Oswald a pair of roller skates, jumps into his car, and dashes right up a moonbeam, disappearing into the distance and leaving Oswald to skate the many weary miles back to town.
Errors: Some sources incorrectly title this cartoon "Yankee Clippers."
Reviews: Coming Soon!

HEN FRUIT
Release Date: February 4, 1929
Copyright Date: LP25996 January 8, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: January 12, 1929
Direction: Isadore Freleng
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald is foreman of the egg factory, but even with every modern device in the way of alarm clocks, it's difficult for him to get on the job. The time clock, however, never misses a trick and doesn't let any late pullets get by him. A young cockerel manages to sneak in, however, and certainly disrupts the business of egg-laying! Oswald takes so long to pull his egg basket that before he gets out to his tin lizzie [car], a roaming goat has swallowed it! Oswald has a terrible time with that goat, but finally makes him disgorge his lizzie. Of course, it's chewed to bits, but Oswald collects it in a couple of tin cans and soon shakes it together again. Smothering the goat in a cloud of gas fumes, Oswald disappears over the hill.
Notes: The first sound cartoon released by Universal
Errors: Jeff Lenburg incorrectly refers to HEN FRUIT as a working title for HENPECKED (1930)—a later Walter Lantz Oswald cartoon.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

Sick Cylinders SICK CYLINDERS
Release Date: February 18, 1929
Copyright Date: LP24945 December 26, 1928
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: December 29, 1928
Direction: Hugh Harman and Ben Clopton
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald, with his newly-acquired car, makes the home of his best girl in "high". She is delighted and ready for a ride in no time. They hardly get started before the flivver begins to act up. Everything goes wrong! Finally Oswald had to crawl under it!
      A playful pup appears and pesters Oswald to throw sticks for him, which delays matters considerably as the sticks get larger and larger. Long before Oswald gets things shipshape, the girl is impatiently looking at her watch. Eventually they get underway and everything is lovely until, on a mountain road, they jar a big rock loose. That rock seems possessed and pursues them uphill and down dale!
      From then on their ride is a bust! They finally fall into a sand pit, and the best girl doesn't hesitate to tell Oswald what she thinks. In the midst of the tirade her other beau breezes up in a "straight-eight," and the ungrateful minx goes off with him, leaving Oswald to take it out on his little car. And what he says!!!
Notes: Some scenes from this cartoon were later remade very closely in such Harman-Ising Warner Bros. efforts as SINKIN' IN THE BATHTUB (1930) and BOSKO'S HOLIDAY (1931).
Errors: Erroneously noted by some sources as a 1926 release. Of course, Oswald himself didn't even exist at that time.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

HOLD 'EM OZZIE!
Release Date: March 4, 1929
Copyright Date: LP25997 January 8, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: January 12, 1929
Direction: R. C. Hamilton
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Being kingpin on the football team is pie for Oswald. He loves the cheers and the excitement. On the arrival of all the animals, large and small, the game really gets underway. Oswald certainly has plenty of close calls and terrible scares, for the opposing team are terrors. Even when Oswald holds onto the ball through thick and thin, it looks for a minute as though they're going to get him. Oswald is a fast thinker, however, makes his ears into a propeller, and flies right down the field and over the goalposts. Of course he wins the cup, and the crowd goes wild.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

THE SUICIDE SHEIK
Release Date: March 18, 1929
Copyright Date: MP5832 February 13, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: February 21, 1929
Direction: Hugh Harman
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald and his lady love, tripping along the primrose path, have not a thought of catastrophe. When they reach Miss Cottontail's house, Oswald asks her to be his bride. Some subconscious imp gives Miss Cottontail a preview of Mr. And Mrs. Oswald and all the little Oswalds. She haughtily disdains his offer and leaves him cold.
      Poor distracted Oswald can see no way out but suicide. Coming upon Husky Wolf hauling a safe up the side of a building, Oswald lets out the rope, hoping the safe will fall on him. It's his unlucky day—the safe falls on Wolf. When Oswald sees a cannon, he feels his problem is solved. But it's a most peculiar cannon, and Oswald's attempts to shoot himself are unsuccessful. He decides on hanging, and attaching a rope comfortably around his neck and to the cannon, he gives the latter a shove. Down the hill it goes faster and faster with Oswald dragged behind, hitting only the very high spots.
      Meanwhile Miss Cottontail's house has caught fire and the poor darling is screaming for help. It seems she is doomed. But the cannon strikes a boulder and shoots Oswald high into the air. He lands right in front of the burning house. It takes him less than a jiffy to rescue his lady love. In the joy of reunion, their troubles are entirely forgotten.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

A rare poster for 'Alpine Antics' ALPINE ANTICS
Release Date: April 1, 1929
Copyright Date: MP5831 February 13, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: February 21, 1929
Direction: Tom Palmer
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald is happy as a lark on his Alpine retreat. Milking the antelope is a pleasure. At least until her soul mate yodeled from a nearby mountaintop. Then the thoughtless hussy kicks the milk bucket into the air and is off! Oswald has hardly recovered from his surprise when a great St. Bernard comes dashing up with an S. O. S. from Fanny, Oswald's sweetheart. She's in a perilous position on a distant mountainside and in immediate need of rescuing.
      The poor St. Bernard is in a state of collapse, but Oswald goads him into action and away they go. The snow-covered mountainside makes the going difficult; it looks at times as if the poor dog just can't make the grade. Oswald, however, is full of ingenious methods for helping him along. They finally reach Fanny, hanging from the limb of a tree. Oswald is frantic. Making a desperate effort, Oswald and the dog succeed in freeing her. They even elude the clutches of a desperate wolf who suddenly appears and chases them for miles and miles.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

THE LUMBERJACK
Release Date: April 15, 1929
Copyright Date: MP5880 February 25, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: March 1, 1929
Direction: Ben Clopton
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      While the animals keep things humming at the sawmill, little Oswald walks through the forest chopping down trees. But one tree is a tough one—so tough that Oswald's axe goes back on him and nearly knocks him out. Puzzling what to do, he hears a noise. Aha—an idea! There's a sleeping pup who was sawing a lot of wood in his sleep. Oswald uses the sleeping dog's saw and it works! Lo and behold, the trunk exposes a bag of gold, but before little Oswald can take it, a brute Bear [Pete] reaches for it and away he scoots. Oswald runs right after him.
      The bear makes a getaway down a stream in a canoe, but Oswald catches up to him by riding on two logs—using his tail first as a rotor, then as an outboard motor. Oswald diverts the rushing stream so that it runs over a cliff, then grabs the bear as he passes by. While they are both falling, Oswald snatches the money and flies back to safety on the clifftop. Meanwhile the bear falls into the jaws of a huge crocodile. Oswald in great glee sees the crocodile salt the bear to taste and (galoomp!) swallow him.
Reviews:
      "In this cartoon we have Oswald, the funny little rabbit, in another of his adventures, this time as a lumberjack.
      "While the animals are busy in the sawmill, Oswald strolls into the forest to cut down trees. As he is cutting down a tree, he finds a bag of gold which is snatched by a bear who scoots off with it. In the chase that follows, Oswald executes many funny tactics, especially when he uses his tail as a wind propeller.
      "This cartoon has some effects which make it very entertaining." —Thomas Tyrrell, Motion Picture News (March 23, 1929)

THE FISHING FOOL
Release Date: April 29, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0036 March 29, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: March 30, 1929
Direction: R.C. Hamilton
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald is asleep at the line while the fish have a grand time diving around him. They steal the bait and generally carry on. Oswald wakes up to find that his sleep hasn't been profitable. When Sally Stork steps up and ducks her head in the water—fetching out a fish or two for a slight snack—Oswald decides to use the bird's services. He hooks Sally on the line, knots her neck so she can't swallow, and casts her off. But when a whale comes up as the catch and nearly swallows our Oswald (after devouring Sally Stork!), the rabbit decides to rush out of the fish's way.
      Next Oswald tries music, which pleases one fish into doing a dance. Oswald gets the little fish in his clutches—but lo and behold, a huge finner comes out of the water at that moment. There is a battle. Oswald, the winner, is just about to carve a neat sirloin from his prize when a thief comes along and steals it. The fadeout comes with Oswald hot in pursuit of the burglar.
Errors: Listed in Motion Picture News as "Fishing Fools."
Reviews:
      "Sound fits a cartoon like the proverbial rubber glove, and, if these joking creations in black and white were amusing before the sound era, they are doubly so now. This Oswald is one of the best we've seen. It is greatly heightened in effectiveness by amusing sound interpolations.
      "The cartoon shows Oswald fishing. He is a poor hand at the game, for nary a fish does he catch. Finally he casts his rod away in disgust and resorts to strategy. He plays phonograph records of Delilah's song and similar music, and an an entranced fish begins to flip back and forth over the sands in the rhythms of the dance. This is an amusing scene, and the fun is maintained when Oswald, his phonograph horn smashed, uses his tail as the needle and his mouth as an amplifier for the reproduction of the music." —Raymond Ganly, Motion Picture News (March 30, 1929)

STAGE STUNTS
Release Date: May 13, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0037 March 29, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: March 30, 1929
Direction: Walter Lantz
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald's debut as an actor is attended with much gaiety. Mice musicians tickle the hippo's ivories, the thousand-leg chorus is sprightly, and Oswald is making a great success as snake-charmer and xylophone player—when an old meanie in the audience breaks his instrument; and gosh, how bottles fly!
      Oswald, not to be foiled, returns with a skinny horse and plays on the animal's ribs. But a pup throws a bomb, which the horse swallows. Pandemonium! Out of the theater they rush! Though Oswald gets the bomb out of the horse's mouth, the thing follows them and they're blown up. Oswald has a pleasant dream of kissing a nymph, but comes to finding himself kissing the horse. He has the horse knock him out again so that he can again enjoy his dream.
Errors: Jeff Lenburg incorrectly lists this cartoon as a Walter Lantz production, whereas in fact it was only directed by him.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

STRIPES AND STARS
Release Date: May 27, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0098 April 19, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: April 22, 1929
Direction: Walter Lantz
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Times are hard for our Oswald when his days are spent in cleaning the police court floor. He has such a time keeping it free from tobacco juice—the captain is an old meanie who just would "chaw" while knitting.
      Big Bruin Boloney, the gangster, holds up the jeweler. All the big and little Ben clocks throw up their hands in fright and the cuckoo retires into his nest. The dials all go wrong. All available police try their best to catch Big Bruin, but he blows them up.
      Little Oswald is promoted to the rank of cop and goes out to get his "ham" (Boloney). The Big Bru(in)te nearly gets Oswald, but our hero comes to the courthouse triumphantly with the Bear a captive under a manhole. Oswald is made judge, and the bear has to clean up tobacco juice forever after.
Errors: Jeff Lenburg incorrectly lists this cartoon as a Walter Lantz production, whereas in fact it was only directed by him.
Reviews:
      "Sound lifts this Oswald, just about an average cartoon, into the laugh realm and makes of it a bright reel that'll liven up programs handicapped by deadwood features. The rabbit is a porter delegated to capture a lawbreaking bear terrorizing the police force. He gets his man and hauls him before his chief to collect the reward of judgeship. Several really good ideas, the work of the nimble-witted cartoonists, decorate the affair and push it along to a laugh finis. Walter Lantz, billed at the director, is probably chiefly responsible for its success." —Raymond Ganly, Motion Picture News (May 11, 1929)

THE WICKED WEST
Release Date: June 10, 1929
Copyright Date: LP340 April 27, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: April 30, 1929
Direction: Isadore Freleng
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald, a new Lochinvar, a bit weary from much lassoing and riding, reins in his horse and stops at a saloon, produces his own seidel of beer and amuses himself by having the Mouse-on-the-Keys Piano play for him. When the mouse drops on the ivories in exhaustion, Oswald goes in search of further adventure and "noses" in on a checker game which Big Bruin is enjoying in solo. Staking his money bag on the game, Oswald through brilliant play turns victor. The loss is too much for the Bruin to Bear and the ensuing battle is a fierce one.
      After the "war" is over, our hero gallops away in triumph, to find new fields to conquer.
Errors: Jeff Lenburg incorrectly lists this cartoon as a Walter Lantz production.
Reviews:
      "This Oswald, presented with synchronized score and sound effects, proves highly entertaining; its cartoon work, apart from the musical advantage, being top-notch. I. Freleng directed.
      "Oswald is a cowboy adventurer who plays a grumpy bear a game of checkers; winning all his dough, because the bear took the advice of a kibitzing spectator. This highlight is well done and scenes showing the rabbit doing a Ken Maynard upon his horse are also funny." —Raymond Ganly, Motion Picture News (May 11, 1929)

ICE MAN'S LUCK
Release Date: June 10, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0369 June 22, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: June 28, 1929
Direction: R.C. Hamilton
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Our little hero finds his job as an iceman not so hot. A feline tries to make a cat-away with a huge cake of ice, and only the glacÚ eye of Oswald prevents it. Then, too, just as Ozzie's favorite maid is about to present him with a delicious hot pie, big Bear [Pete] butts in, and the first thing you know, goes off with the burnt offering. But the final deluge of poor luck comes when Oswald and his faithful mare are nearly drowned by melted ice—caused through the placing of a bonfire under the ice-truck.
Errors: Jeff Lenburg incorrectly lists this cartoon as a Walter Lantz production and gives an erroneous release date of July 8, 1929.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

NUTS AND JOLTS
Release Date: June 24, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0294 June 8, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: June 14, 1929
Direction: Hugh Harman
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald walks blithely down the street—but old Bear salesman [Pete] coaxes him into his used car yard and before Oswald knows it, he's the owner of an acrobatic lizzie.
      Traffic regulations mean nothing to him, and he gives a copper a great chase. After wrecking the appearance of a few buildings, he drives into the car yard again—and gets the Bear's goat by wrecking all the orphan cars there. Oswald grabs a horse and wagon and flees with Bear following him. He lands at a cave where Bear gives him a bad beating; and our last view of our little hero shows him heading for parts unknown at more than the speed limit.
Errors: Jeff Lenburg incorrectly lists this cartoon as a Walter Lantz production; later editions of his book inaccurately cite the title as "Nuts and Bolts," though the first edition got it right.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

Two frames from 'Jungle Jingles' JUNGLE JINGLES
Release Date: July 22, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0392 July 6, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: July 8, 1929
Direction: Ben Clopton
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Riding a cantankerous ostrich through the jungle is Oswald's lot. Things go from bad to worse when the ostrich lays an egg and then gets blown out from under our African hunter.
      When Oswald goes to investigate, he discovers a bowling elephant, who is anything but a par shot. Oswald soon terrifies the calloused beast by half-choking him. Imagine his embarrassment when he discovers it's only the young son of a huge mother elephant. It takes a lively mouse, under Ozzie's orders, to chase the pachyderm away.
      Oswald's amusement is ended when he is pursued by a lively lion that runs him into a hollow log. But our hero quickly removes the lion's shining bridgework—and our last vision is that of Oswald nipping the king of the beasts with his own molars.
Errors: Jeff Lenburg incorrectly lists this cartoon as a Walter Lantz production.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

WEARY WILLIES
Release Date: July 22, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0421 July 19, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: July 23, 1929
Direction: Isadore Freleng
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald is trying the hobo life, but an encounter with a copper takes the keenness out of his freedom. Life looks promising again when he meets Brother Bear hobo [Pete] who is boiling coffee over a campfire. Oswald donates an egg to the repast—which is promptly stolen.
      Suddenly they see a freshly-roasted chicken in a pantry window. Oswald is made to act as purloiner. His first attempt at theft is squashed by a ferocious bulldog.
      Finally a neat-but-not-flashy set of long woolies on a line acts as end-man, and trolleys the bird to Ozzie. Foiled again (for a policeman happens on the scene), down the unfriendly road rushes our hero. Then the policeman seizes the fowl. The bulldog, spying this, chases the officer into the far horizon, much to Oswald's glee.
Errors: In the first edition of Of Mice and Magic, Leonard Maltin incorrectly lists this short as a Walter Lantz production. The error was corrected in later editions.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

SAUCY SAUSAGES
Release Date: August 19, 1929
Copyright Date: MP0504 July 31, 1929
Registration Filed at Copyright Office: August 7, 1929
Production Number: 114
Direction: Ben Clopton
Synchronization and Score: Bert Fiske
Original Copyright Synopsis:
      Oswald, fancy-dog-meat butcher, furnishes music for the execution of those hounds who go into the making of hot dogs. In fact, he is a kind-hearted merchant and even rescues a crying child-cat from the orphanage across the street. But that's where he makes his great mistake. The kitten cannot resist the lure of meat. He encourages all his playmate orphans to raid the shop, and before the day is out Oswald vows never to befriend orphans again.
Notes: The final Oswald cartoon produced by the Winkler staff.
Errors: Jeff Lenburg and Leonard Maltin both incorrectly list this cartoon as a Walter Lantz production.
Reviews: Coming Soon!

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